We Four Elements

The adventures of four friends through time, space, and ridiculous moments of emotional instability (also elemental magic and guns)

Got Questions? | Characters | About the Author | Ivy (Air) | Ehune (Fire) | Marya (Water) | Adriana (Earth) | Garden Variety (short stories) | Got longer questions?
3:39 PM
October 13th, 2014

grayskiesfashion:

GiantEye - Lock Pick Earrings

Because sometimes you just need a pair of fancy earrings that double as lock picks
- Gray

(via lord-kitschener)

8:34 PM
October 12th, 2014
ancwritingresources:

Resources: Writing Injuries and in Hospitals 
So you want to write about an injured character, but it’s been years since you’ve been to the hospital, or you’ve simply never had this particular injury. It’s been said that writers should write what they know, but this advice is limiting and outdated. With a whole world of information out there, there’s no reason you shouldn’t write the character you want. So when writing an injured character, it’s important to know which injuries will lead you to which parts of the hospital, what a hospital is like, and what procedures, treatments, and recovery is like for each particular injury. Here are some sources I hope will help. 

Hospitals:
Best Hospitals In the US
List of United States Hospitals and Medical Centers
The Purpose of Color Coded Scrubs
Hospital Color Codes
Hospital Standards
An Example Hospital Layout
New Hospital Visitation Policies 
Injuries


Traumatic Brain Injury
Common Car Accident Caused Injuries
How Do Comas Work?
How Do Bones Break and How To Fix Them
10 Incurable Diseases
How Is Cancer Diagnosed? (For More on Cancer, Check Here.)
Preparing For Your Hospital Stay
Preparing for Inpatient Surgery
Recovery:


Recovering From Abdominal Surgery
56 Things to Do While Recovering From Surgery
What To Expected When Recovering From Surgery
Recovering From Falls
Life After Cancer Treatment

Remember that every injury is as unique as your character, but it’s important to know the facts; the more details you can give, the more the reader will understand what your character is going through. This is a great way to set the stakes, set up a plot, or set the scene. 


ancwritingresources:

Resources: Writing Injuries and in Hospitals 

So you want to write about an injured character, but it’s been years since you’ve been to the hospital, or you’ve simply never had this particular injury. It’s been said that writers should write what they know, but this advice is limiting and outdated. With a whole world of information out there, there’s no reason you shouldn’t write the character you want. So when writing an injured character, it’s important to know which injuries will lead you to which parts of the hospital, what a hospital is like, and what procedures, treatments, and recovery is like for each particular injury. Here are some sources I hope will help. 

Hospitals:

Injuries
Recovery:
Remember that every injury is as unique as your character, but it’s important to know the facts; the more details you can give, the more the reader will understand what your character is going through. This is a great way to set the stakes, set up a plot, or set the scene. 

(via manuscripts-never-burn)

9:17 PM
October 7th, 2014
eilisoneal:

thelandofmaps:

Travel Times to New York in 1800 (sorry for low quality) [488x596]CLICK HERE FOR MORE MAPS!thelandofmaps.tumblr.com

Cool writing reference.


eilisoneal:

thelandofmaps:

Travel Times to New York in 1800 (sorry for low quality) [488x596]
CLICK HERE FOR MORE MAPS!
thelandofmaps.tumblr.com

Cool writing reference.

(via frigginwinchesters)

7:54 PM
October 1st, 2014

Anonymous wrote...
hi! i rp as a canon character who's an ME, but the show he was in didn't really show much of what he does other than him finding evidence inside victims during autopsies, and then briefing the detectives on cause of death and other stuff he's found.. i can't really find any decent descriptions of the job role on google, so do you know of any good research on autopsy procedure and stuff?


8:32 PM
September 27th, 2014
http://frigginwinchesters.tumblr.com/post/98591170276

duskenpath:

oli-via:

duskenpath:

Rest stops on highways are liminal spaces where the veil is thin and nobody can tell me differently

Explain

The explanation is that liminal spaces are in between places that bridge Here with There, so in fairy tales we often have the Fairy…

6:33 PM
September 27th, 2014
nyctaeus:

18th century Indian dagger with sheath, made with steel, shark skin, jade, gold, ruby, emerald, sapphire and silver. In the collection of The Metropolitan Museum of Art.


nyctaeus:

18th century Indian dagger with sheath, made with steel, shark skin, jade, gold, ruby, emerald, sapphire and silver. In the collection of The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

(via littlebumbletea)

10:29 AM
August 31st, 2014

Anonymous wrote...
Uhhhh elves are NORSE legends, as in WHITE. Sorry but you can't just go against the lore for your own SJW bullshit


morrigansmorals:

witchymorrigan:

Oh BOY I was prepared for this. Sit your ass down, buddy. It’s story time.

The myth of “elves” or elf-like creatures exists in cultures across the globe. For example, in Hindu mythology, later adapted to Buddhism, there are Gandharvas who sometimes correspond to European male elves and Asparas who sometimes correspond to female elves. On a more linguistic level, the origin of the word “elf” has been linked to the Indian myth of the Ribhus. Or maybe you’d like another example of elf-like mythology from another folklore.

The Emere of the Yoruba culture are a sort of super children, who can travel between the worlds at will, are beautiful and powerful – the Elves of West Africa.

Then there’s the Duende of Latin American folklore, the Japanese Mazoku sub-genre of mythology, the Chinese Flower-elves… the list goes on, really.

And even if that weren’t the case. The fantasy genre, particularly the high fantasy genre, does not keep to the Norse/Scandanavian folklore of elves at all.

Elves have become part of a wonderful new mythology that has been created. From J.R.R. Tolkien’s otherwordly high elves to the downtrodden elves of Dragon Age (the world in which I was basing my picture, by the way) people are beginning to create their own lore, their own stories.

And are you seriously trying to tell me that in new, fantastical and magical worlds that people have created there is no space for non-white elves?

If you truly are that close-minded, I actually pity you.

you tell em my friend

image

4:34 PM
August 17th, 2014

Comparing Astrology / Mbti

jenfvr:

Fire Signs : Se

Aries : ESFP/ESTP
LEO : ESFP/ENTJ
Saggittarius : Se & Ti ; ESTP/ISTP

EARTH SIGNS : Te, Si, Ni,

Taurus : High Si & Te ; ISTJ/ESTJ
Virgo : Ni - Te ; INTJ (maybe ISTJ too)
Capricorn : ENTJ / ESTJ (TE dom)


AIR SIGNS : A Combination of Fe, Ti, Ne /or Ni

Gemini : Ne & Ti ; ENTP
Libra : xxFJ (Fe dom/aux)
Aquarius : ENTP

WATER SIGNS : Fi, Se/Ne

Cancer : Fi and Se (i would say Fi and Si) ISFP
Scorpio ; High Ni (fixed focus) and Fi
Pisces : High Fi and Ne, low Te (INFP)

(via myersandbriggs)

11:40 PM
August 15th, 2014

(Source: bobbimorses, via waverlyrowan)

8:59 PM
August 12th, 2014
bamhelps:


Periodically, I come across folks in writing and roleplay that have their character’s career set as a mortician. Without reading anything else in their bio, I already know they probably got a lot of what goes into the job wrong based on the word “mortician” alone. ‘But it’s just roleplay it’s meant to be fun, not serious.' You're also the same jerk that touts yourself to friends as a writer, so write RIGHT, god bammit.
"Morticians," as the outdated term is, are actually called funeral directors. If you didn’t know that, yet want to have a character that works in death care, then you need this guide. 
My biggest beef is with people romanticizing this field of work as “deep or edgy.” If you think using a long vacuum needle to suck the remaining feces (that’s literal SHIT) and urine from a body through a hole in the abdomen is in any way “edgy,” you don’t need to be writing a funeral director.

In this guide I will be going over:
Myths and facts about death care
How to get into mortuary school in the US
Tools of the trade
Embalming (Some graphic preparation gifs included!)
Prepping a body for viewing
Cremation 
Occupational hazards and risks
The office side of things
Trigger warnings include:
DEATH, GORE, BLOOD, VISUAL IMAGERY OF DEATH

Read More


bamhelps:

Periodically, I come across folks in writing and roleplay that have their character’s career set as a mortician. Without reading anything else in their bio, I already know they probably got a lot of what goes into the job wrong based on the word “mortician” alone. ‘But it’s just roleplay it’s meant to be fun, not serious.' You're also the same jerk that touts yourself to friends as a writer, so write RIGHT, god bammit.

"Morticians," as the outdated term is, are actually called funeral directors. If you didn’t know that, yet want to have a character that works in death care, then you need this guide. 

My biggest beef is with people romanticizing this field of work as “deep or edgy.” If you think using a long vacuum needle to suck the remaining feces (that’s literal SHIT) and urine from a body through a hole in the abdomen is in any way “edgy,” you don’t need to be writing a funeral director.

In this guide I will be going over:

  • Myths and facts about death care
  • How to get into mortuary school in the US
  • Tools of the trade
  • Embalming (Some graphic preparation gifs included!)
  • Prepping a body for viewing
  • Cremation 
  • Occupational hazards and risks
  • The office side of things
Trigger warnings include:
DEATH, GORE, BLOOD, VISUAL IMAGERY OF DEATH

Read More

(via catawampuscreations)