We Four Elements

The adventures of four friends through time, space, and ridiculous moments of emotional instability (also elemental magic and guns)

Got Questions? | Characters | About the Author | Ivy (Air) | Ehune (Fire) | Marya (Water) | Adriana (Earth) | Garden Variety (short stories) | Got longer questions?
10:29 AM
August 31st, 2014

Anonymous wrote...
Uhhhh elves are NORSE legends, as in WHITE. Sorry but you can't just go against the lore for your own SJW bullshit


morrigansmorals:

maleficarmorrigan:

Oh BOY I was prepared for this. Sit your ass down, buddy. It’s story time.

The myth of “elves” or elf-like creatures exists in cultures across the globe. For example, in Hindu mythology, later adapted to Buddhism, there are Gandharvas who sometimes correspond to European male elves and Asparas who sometimes correspond to female elves. On a more linguistic level, the origin of the word “elf” has been linked to the Indian myth of the Ribhus. Or maybe you’d like another example of elf-like mythology from another folklore.

The Emere of the Yoruba culture are a sort of super children, who can travel between the worlds at will, are beautiful and powerful – the Elves of West Africa.

Then there’s the Duende of Latin American folklore, the Japanese Mazoku sub-genre of mythology, the Chinese Flower-elves… the list goes on, really.

And even if that weren’t the case. The fantasy genre, particularly the high fantasy genre, does not keep to the Norse/Scandanavian folklore of elves at all.

Elves have become part of a wonderful new mythology that has been created. From J.R.R. Tolkien’s otherwordly high elves to the downtrodden elves of Dragon Age (the world in which I was basing my picture, by the way) people are beginning to create their own lore, their own stories.

And are you seriously trying to tell me that in new, fantastical and magical worlds that people have created there is no space for non-white elves?

If you truly are that close-minded, I actually pity you.

you tell em my friend

image

4:34 PM
August 17th, 2014

Comparing Astrology / Mbti

jenfvr:

Fire Signs : Se

Aries : ESFP/ESTP
LEO : ESFP/ENTJ
Saggittarius : Se & Ti ; ESTP/ISTP

EARTH SIGNS : Te, Si, Ni,

Taurus : High Si & Te ; ISTJ/ESTJ
Virgo : Ni - Te ; INTJ (maybe ISTJ too)
Capricorn : ENTJ / ESTJ (TE dom)


AIR SIGNS : A Combination of Fe, Ti, Ne /or Ni

Gemini : Ne & Ti ; ENTP
Libra : xxFJ (Fe dom/aux)
Aquarius : ENTP

WATER SIGNS : Fi, Se/Ne

Cancer : Fi and Se (i would say Fi and Si) ISFP
Scorpio ; High Ni (fixed focus) and Fi
Pisces : High Fi and Ne, low Te (INFP)

(via myersandbriggs)

11:40 PM
August 15th, 2014
8:59 PM
August 12th, 2014
bamhelps:


Periodically, I come across folks in writing and roleplay that have their character’s career set as a mortician. Without reading anything else in their bio, I already know they probably got a lot of what goes into the job wrong based on the word “mortician” alone. ‘But it’s just roleplay it’s meant to be fun, not serious.' You're also the same jerk that touts yourself to friends as a writer, so write RIGHT, god bammit.
"Morticians," as the outdated term is, are actually called funeral directors. If you didn’t know that, yet want to have a character that works in death care, then you need this guide. 
My biggest beef is with people romanticizing this field of work as “deep or edgy.” If you think using a long vacuum needle to suck the remaining feces (that’s literal SHIT) and urine from a body through a hole in the abdomen is in any way “edgy,” you don’t need to be writing a funeral director.

In this guide I will be going over:
Myths and facts about death care
How to get into mortuary school in the US
Tools of the trade
Embalming (Some graphic preparation gifs included!)
Prepping a body for viewing
Cremation 
Occupational hazards and risks
The office side of things
Trigger warnings include:
DEATH, GORE, BLOOD, VISUAL IMAGERY OF DEATH

Read More


bamhelps:

Periodically, I come across folks in writing and roleplay that have their character’s career set as a mortician. Without reading anything else in their bio, I already know they probably got a lot of what goes into the job wrong based on the word “mortician” alone. ‘But it’s just roleplay it’s meant to be fun, not serious.' You're also the same jerk that touts yourself to friends as a writer, so write RIGHT, god bammit.

"Morticians," as the outdated term is, are actually called funeral directors. If you didn’t know that, yet want to have a character that works in death care, then you need this guide. 

My biggest beef is with people romanticizing this field of work as “deep or edgy.” If you think using a long vacuum needle to suck the remaining feces (that’s literal SHIT) and urine from a body through a hole in the abdomen is in any way “edgy,” you don’t need to be writing a funeral director.

In this guide I will be going over:

  • Myths and facts about death care
  • How to get into mortuary school in the US
  • Tools of the trade
  • Embalming (Some graphic preparation gifs included!)
  • Prepping a body for viewing
  • Cremation 
  • Occupational hazards and risks
  • The office side of things
Trigger warnings include:
DEATH, GORE, BLOOD, VISUAL IMAGERY OF DEATH

Read More

(via catawampuscreations)

9:01 PM
August 11th, 2014

jellydraws:

and here it is.

my 24 hour comic

took 22 hours. and then a little longer for some edits but. I’ve still got another hour till my 24 is officially up, and I’m definitely gonna be snoozing.

For having no planning except a selkie design and a rough concept of the girl, I think I did alright. I definitely pushed my self to try new things and, I’m happy about that. there are some things I’d like to tweak but… NOPE! IM DONE!

I also learned how much I can get done when I don’t distract myself so much. have to figure out how to rein that in haha.

also, if you’re curious about the title! fun fact time thanks to wikipedia (so it may or may not be true)

Selkies (also known as silkies or selchies) are mythological creatures found in FaroeseIcelandic,[1] Irish,[2] and Scottish folklore. The word derives from earlier Scots selich, (from Old English seolh meaning seal)

okay. sleep time. 

goodnightttt!!

(via catawampuscreations)

2:05 PM
August 8th, 2014

tamorapierce:

whiskey-wolf:

$2,500.00 Titanium and Gold Lip Pearl Linerlock

This knife is from Suchat’s New Diamond Edition. This liner locking folder features a carved Robert Calcinore Mosaic Damascus blade. The handle has carved titanium bolsters, carved gold lip pearl scales with pink/green/yellow stone inserts, carved matching Damascus rear bolsters, and carved and anodized titanium liners and back-spacer.

This is going to leave a nasty, nasty wound.

9:15 PM
August 6th, 2014
fashioninfographics:

A Visual Dictionary of Tops
More Visual Glossaries (for Her): Backpacks / Bags / Bra Types / Hats / Belt knots / Coats / Collars / Darts / Dress Shapes / Dress Silhouettes / Eyeglass frames / Eyeliner Strokes / Hangers / Harem Pants / Heels / Nail shapes / Necklaces / Necklines /  Puffy Sleeves / Shoes / Shorts / Silhouettes / Skirts / Tartans / Vintage Hats / Waistlines / Wool
Via


9:01 PM
August 5th, 2014

schrodingersowen:

important headcanons to consider:

  • can they use chopsticks
  • what do they do when they cant sleep
  • what would they impulse buy at the grocery store
  • what order do they wash things in the shower
  • what’s their coffee order
  • what sort of apps would they have on their smartphone
  • how do they act around children
  • what would they watch on tv when they’re bored and nothing they really like is on

(via bisexualnatasharomanoff)

9:01 PM
July 30th, 2014

policymic:

"Masculinity is a trait, not a gender"

In an effort to both allocate space for and document the existence of masculine women, photographer Meg Allen created a powerful series of portraits for an exhibit at Cafe Gabriela in Oakland, Calif.

Entitled BUTCH, Allen’s series not only represents genderqueer women for a broader, heteronormative audience, but reaffirms butch identity within the queer community at a time when “butch flight,” or gender transitioning, is arguably becoming more and more commonplace. It is, as Allen says on her website, “an homage to the bull-daggers and female husbands before me, and to the young studs, gender queers and bois who continue to bloom into the present.”

Read moreFollow policymic

(Source: micdotcom, via thegirlwithgoldeyes)

8:30 PM
July 30th, 2014
megwrites | Describing characters of color

tubooks:

pelicanwriter:

Diversity isn’t just about race. It’s about culture and heritage. Great discussion here.

Excerpt:


Race is not just a color, race is about culture, ethnicity, religion, family background, heritage, history.

That’s why it is not enough, Wellmeaning Clueless White Person, to take a character, say they’re brown skinned and continue writing them exactly as you’d write a white character and think you’ve done due dilligence. As N.K. Jemisin said herself (in comments):

“I don’t walk around constantly thinking “Hey, I’m black today. Blackitty blackitty black…”, but being black informs nearly every part of my daily existence. Where I choose to live (generally communities with a certain percentage of black people in the population, so I won’t be alone), what clothes I wear (earth tones look good on me; pastels do not), what foods I grow in my balcony garden (my collard greens have aphids! ::wail::), how I wear my hair (hmm, a blowout today, I think. Nah, it’s Saturday, I’ll just put it up in a puff), etc.”



We white people have been fooled into thinking that white is a base, a state of normalcy, that it is not it’s own ethnicity.

Apple pie is an ethnic food. Country-western music is an ethnic music. My name (Megan) is an ethnic name. It’s just that my ethnicity, my race, has dominance, gets treated like the norm, the standard. But it doesn’t make it any less an ethnicity.

My race also infuses and informs every part of my daily existence, just as Ms. Jemisin’s does her.

(via writeworld)